Joe Gertler's Memaerobilia
Aero Engines Aviation Art
Instruments Wright Brothers
Race Cars, Boats and History Miscellaneous and Other
Documents and Signatures For Sale and Apraisals

Aero Engines

In the early years of collecting, our focus was primarily on vintage aero engines.

It was decided to try to collect pre-WWII aero engines because they were generally, more affordable and took up less space. In the 1960’s and 1970’s most major museums had an aversion to building or displaying replica or reproduction aircraft. They prided themselves in displaying original aircraft and artifacts, while replicas were considered to be a “counterfeit” exhibit. As examples of older aircraft gradually deteriorated or wore out, and were sent to landfills and scrap yards, that policy gradually changed and museums realized that the only way they would be able to show the public examples of some famous and innovative aeronautical developments, would be to construct replicas and reproductions that were built to the same specifications as the no-longer available original planes.

We had always considered the fact that the key to restoring or replicating many of these aircraft was to use original engines and instruments, which could NOT be easily duplicated, and fabricate wood or steel or aluminum airframe around them, that were built to original specs. We are proud to say that there are several hundred flying replicas and reproduction projects that we have been able to supply these essential items to. For several decades, we would only sell or trade engines that were surplus to our own collection.


 

 

Click on any of the images below for a better view.

Raceway storage
Raceway storage

Raceway storage.

Raceway Collection main display
Raceway Collection main display

Raceway Collection main display.

Raceway Collection main display
Raceway Collection main display

Raceway Collection main display.

1909 Heath serial # 001
1909 Heath serial # 001

This is a one-of-a kind engine was built by a young Ed Heath who went on to establish one of the major U.S firms that sold aircraft and supplies to Pioneer aviators, and supplied engines, kits and parts to many early homebuilders. Famous for his Heath Parasols, light racing aircraft and converted Heath-Henderson aero engines. This engine was built to power his first exhibition aeroplane in 1909. It may now be seen at the Seattle Museum of Flight.

1918 Lawrance 28hp
1918 Lawrance 28hp

These two examples (see below) of the mass-produced 28 hp, two cylinder, air-cooled Lawrance A-3 aero engines were produced to power the early American training aircraft used by the U.S. Signal Corp near the end of WWI in several designs of light aircraft trainers, referred to as “Penguins” because most were designed for familiarization with ground handling, rather than for flight.

As inexpensive WWI Surplus, they enjoyed some popularity among private builders of light aircraft in the 1920’s.

1918 Lawrance 28hp
1918 Lawrance 28hp

See above.

1928 Anzani front
1928 Anzani front

This is a very rare, late 1920’s six cyl., air-cooled 70 hp radial engine. These more reliable light weight radials finally used dual magneto ignition in the last few years of the company’s existence. They had come a long way from the early 1911 six cyl, engines that had used automatic intake valves, pulled open by the intake suction of the piston.

Early Anzani engines powered numerous aeroplanes in the pre-WWI Pioneer era.

1928 Anzani rear
1928 Anzani rear

See above.

1928 Anzani front
1928 Anzani front

See above.

1919 Curtiss C-6 left
1919 Curtiss C-6 left

Curtiss C-6. 160/180 hp; 450 lb. water cooled, similar in power and design to the overhead cam Mercedes 160hp. This was a redesign of the WWI Kirkham designed K-6, with aluminum cylinder jackets cast in pairs; 4 valves per cyl. This engine was found scattered all over the floor of a Pennsylvania barn floor, in the early 80’s, when we went there to pick up a pre-war race car. Now at Seattle Museum of Flight (SMOF).

1919 Curtiss C-6 right
1919 Curtiss C-6 right
1919 Curtiss C-6 right

See above.

1931 Martin 333 (Chevrolair)
1931 Martin 333 (Chevrolair)

Glenn L. Martin Motors of Baltimore MD, acquired this design for Chevrolair Motors in Indianapolis Indiana in 1930. It was designed for racing by the famous auto racer, designer, Louis Chevrolet. The unusual twin-cam inverted 4 cyl. aircooled aero engine, with cast magnesium crankcase was 120hp and 265 lbs. This very rare example now at SMOF.

1933 Church J-3 Marathon left
1933 Church J-3 Marathon left

This 38 hp air racing engine was developed from the earlier Church Henderson motorcycle engine conversions-along lines of the famous Heath-Henderson from Chicago. It is believed that three of these 38 hp racing engines, which powered the Church Midwing and Tilbury Flash racers in the early 1930’s, were built and this is the only one known to survive. SMOF.

1933 Church J-3 Marathon right
1933 Church J-3 Marathon right

See above.

1928 A.D.C. Cirrus 94hp
1928 A.D.C. Cirrus 94hp

This 90 hp light aero engine of the late 1920’s and early ‘30s was used in a variety of popular British and U.S. civil aircraft. This engine is now in a vintage race car in the U.K.

1930 Cleone front
1930 Cleone front

This lightweight 25.27 hp two-cycle, air-cooled aero engine was built in St Louis Missouri in 1930 (SMOF).

1930 Cleone top
1930 Cleone top

See above.

1930 Globe-Dayton L & R
1930 Globe-Dayton L & R

The Globe-Dayton was built in Dayton, Ohio in 1930. Designed around the Ford Model A automobile engine for easy parts availability and service, the 50 hp 173 lb. air-cooled engine used Model A crankshaft, rods and pistons, and 1928 Nash rocker arms. It could use a Ford A carb or special aero carburetor. It is also know as the Dayton Aero Four-In-Line. This is the only known example. (SMOF).

Ford inverted aero conversion left
Ford inverted aero conversion left

A vintage aero engine.

Ford inverted aero conversion right
Ford inverted aero conversion right

A vintage aero engine.

Ford inverted aero conversion right
Ford inverted aero conversion right

A vintage aero engine.

1928 Heath B-4
1928 Heath B-4

Throughout the late 1920s and early ‘30s, the Heath Co., founded by Pioneer Era exhibition pilot, Ed Heath in 1910, offered a wide variety of aero engines, and conversion kits based on a modified Henderson 4 cyl motorcycle engine. The Raceway Collection featured 11 different versions of these engines, from crudely converted motorcycle engines, to those with dual-ignition and even inverted racing engines. The rarest & most sought-after type is this B-4 Heath factory production version, using Heath’s own designed cylinders and the best of all the modification parts it offered. (SMOF)

1929 Heath B-4 left
1929 Heath B-4 left

See above.

1929 Heath B-4 right
1929 Heath B-4 right

See above.

1928 Heath-Henderson dual-ignition right
1928 Heath-Henderson dual-ignition right

A vintage aero engine.

1928 Heath-Henderson dual-ignition left
1928 Heath-Henderson dual-ignition left

A vintage aero engine.

1937 German KHD diesel 8 cyl. radial
1937 German KHD diesel 8 cyl. radial

This fascinating 8 cyl. Air-cooled, two-stroke, diesel rotary engine, was designed, in secret in 1937. The KHD firm was the oldest engine manufacturing firm, descending from the Otto firm. Built in the old Oberursel factory, it featured a quick-change propeller-hub with a knock-off spinner nut, like those used on race car wheels, among many other innovative and unusual features. The successfully tested design was set aside to concentrate on production of military aircraft engines. A design that seems ideal for mass production today, this engine was returned to Germany to an unidentified buyer who acted through an agent.

1938 French Minie Model C
1938 French Minie Model C

A vintage aero engine.

1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion front
1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion front

This 1927 conversion of a WWI 9 cyl. 80hp LeRhone , from rotary to radial configuration, was by The Quick Airmotor Co. of Wichita, Kansas. Other conversions were also manufactured by Tips and Smith. In the 1920s, surplus WWI obsolete rotary engines were available for $25 each, new-in the crate. (*Now they are $25,000!)

This Conversion used a new aluminum intake housing, which moved the intake pipes behind the original case for carbureted intake. Since the cylinders were no longer spinning for cooling, crude air baffles were welded to the original cyl heads. Although production costs were minimal, the results were awful. There are only two or thre of these examples known. (SMOF)

1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion rear
1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion rear

See above.

1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion cyl. mod
1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion cyl. mod

See above.

1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion case mod
1927 Quick /LeRhone conversion case mod

See above.

1931 Cycloplane
1931 Cycloplane

In 1931 the Cycloplane Co of Los Angles, California produced the Cleone design to power its odd training aircraft, the Cycloplane. This is serial # 009 and the only one known to survive. (SMOF).

Raceway engine warehouse
Raceway engine warehouse

Raceway engine warehouse.

1909 Gregoire “Gyp” left
1909 Gregoire “Gyp” left

The Gregoire “Gyp” was the first aero engine to be inverted. (To give the long pre-WWI props more ground clearance, and also to give the pilot a less obstructed view past the engine) Introduced in 1909, This “Gyp” was displayed in a Bleriot Militaire in the 1910 Paris Air Show. The “Gyp” also achieved many famous “firsts” in England and Japan.

It employed an unusual thermo-siphon cooling system. A novel feature were pushrods that traveled through sleeves in the exhaust pipes. A very important engine in the first years of aviation. Now in New Zealand.

1909 Gregoire “Gyp” right
1909 Gregoire “Gyp” right

See above.

1938 Hirth 504
1938 Hirth 504

This 4 cyl. 85 hp inverted air-cooled German engine was developed prior to WWII. Widely used in military courier aircraft, it is shown on a large stand which facilitates overhaul, by rotating the engine. (SMOF).

1918 Hispano-Suiza “H” 300hp
1918 Hispano-Suiza “H” 300hp

A vintage aero engine.

1936 Salmson AB 260hp front
1936 Salmson AB 260hp front

A vintage aero engine.

1932 Salmson NC 135hp rear
1932 Salmson NC 135hp rear

A vintage aero engine.

1936 French E.Train 6T right
1936 French E.Train 6T right

A vintage aero engine.

1928 Velie M-5
1928 Velie M-5

A vintage aero engine.

1928 Velie M-5 on Monocoupe mount
1928 Velie M-5 on Monocoupe mount

A vintage aero engine.

1936 Salmson AB 260hp rear
1936 Salmson AB 260hp rear

A vintage aero engine.

1932 Salmson NC 135hp rear
1932 Salmson NC 135hp rear

A vintage aero engine.

1915 Sturtevant L-head valves left
1915 Sturtevant L-head valves left

The 1915 and 1916 Sturtevants were produced in Marblehead, Massachussetts. The water-cooled, geared engines with dual magneto ignition provided a, then significant, 140 hp.

Used and tested in various U.S. and British WWI aircraft, they are extremely rare today. This is almost certainly the only display pair of the two 140 types. The earlier l-head version is virtually identical to the Thomas Morse V8 aero engine. The later Model 5A had aluminum cylinders cast in pars and overhead valves. The pair are now at SMOF.

1915 Sturtevant 140hp front
1915 Sturtevant 140hp front

See above.

1916 Sturtevant 5A over-head valve left
1916 Sturtevant 5A over-head valve left

See above.

1936 E. Train T6 front/narrow
1936 E. Train T6 front/narrow

In 1935, the E. Train Establishment of Courbevoie, France produced a series of in-line, air-cooled aero engines in 2, 4, and 6 cyl. Versions with interchangeable parts. This nearly 70 year old design would be ideal for many light aircraft projects today. This Model 6T, 60 hp inverted engine, with dual carburetors, weighs only 141 lbs. While the total length is 36 inches, this amazingly streamlined design is just barely wider than a small propeller. This is the only one known. (SMOF).

1936 E. Train T6 front
1936 E. Train T6 front

See above.

1936 E. Train T6 left
1936 E. Train T6 left

See above.

1936 E. Train T6 rear
1936 E. Train T6 rear

See above.

Storage-note 1910 Roberts, lower left
Storage-note 1910 Roberts, lower left

A vintage aero engine.

1930 Dayton Aero Four-In-Line right
1930 Dayton Aero Four-In-Line right

A vintage aero engine.

WWII Ranger V-770 inverted V-12
WWII Ranger V-770 inverted V-12

A vintage aero engine.

 

 

Top of page

Home | Aero Engines | Aviation Art | Instruments | Wright Brothers
Race Cars and History | Misc. and Other | Docs and Signatures | For Sale


To contact Memaerobilia e-mail Joe Gertler at joe@memaerobilia.com


All Images and Text ©2003 Joe Gertler Unless Otherwise Stated
Reproduction or transmission of images or text is forbidden without prior written permission